Jewellery Blog, Gemstone Information

July 9, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge of Brazilianite

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 4:18 pm
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Gemstone Knowledge of Brazilianite

Brazilianite

Brazilianite

Family: Brazillianite belongs to the Phosphate family of Gemstones.

Country Location: Brazillianite can mostly be found in Minas Gerias, Brazil (hence the gemstone’s name) and New Hampshire, USA (very small deposits have been found here).

Rock Type: Brazillianite can be found in coarse grained igneous rock (known as pegmatites), which are rich in phosphate. This is considered an unusual combination as pegmatites are more known to contain other elements. Feldspar’s and Muscovite are found with Brazillianite.

Hardness: Brazillianite’s hardness measures at 5.5 making it a softer gemstone, preferably used in cocktail jewellery worn infrequently. Brazillianite is considered to be one of the hardest phosphate based minerals, hence why it is the only one considered as a gemstone.

Popular Cuts: Brazillianite can be found using the Cushion and Pendeloque cut, which accentuates colour and brilliance. The most common cut used in the Baguette/Step cut. This not only shows its distinctive colour, but also helps the Brazillianite be more durable. Cutters can make better use out of its fractures and inclusions.

Colour: Brazillianite’s colour ranges from “Chartreuse” yellow, pale yellow to yellow green. This gemstone can also appear as colourless in transmitted light

Lustre: Brazillianite’s lustre is Vitreous

History: Brazillianite is a fairly recent gem, having only been discovered in Brazil in 1944, where it was first thought to be Chrysoberyl.

Folklore: Brazillianite is believed to encourage sociability and the creation of new friendships. It also helps the wearer deal with nerves and bad skin conditions.

Family: Brazillianite belongs to the Phosphate family of Gemstones.

Country Location: Brazillianite can mostly be found in Minas Gerias, Brazil (hence the gemstone’s name) and New Hampshire, USA (very small deposits have been found here).

Rock Type: Brazillianite can be found in coarse grained igneous rock (known as pegmatites), which are rich in phosphate. This is considered an unusual combination as pegmatites are more known to contain other elements. Feldspar’s and Muscovite are found with Brazillianite.

Hardness: Brazillianite’s hardness measures at 5.5 making it a softer gemstone, preferably used in cocktail jewellery worn infrequently. Brazillianite is considered to be one of the hardest phosphate based minerals, hence why it is the only one considered as a gemstone.

Popular Cuts: Brazillianite can be found using the Cushion and Pendeloque cut, which accentuates colour and brilliance. The most common cut used in the Baguette/Step cut. This not only shows its distinctive colour, but also helps the Brazillianite be more durable. Cutters can make better use out of its fractures and inclusions.

Colour: Brazillianite’s colour ranges from “Chartreuse” yellow, pale yellow to yellow green. This gemstone can also appear as colourless in transmitted light

Lustre: Brazillianite’s lustre is Vitreous

History: Brazillianite is a fairly recent gem, having only been discovered in Brazil in 1944, where it was first thought to be Chrysoberyl.

Folklore: Brazillianite is believed to encourage sociability and the creation of new friendships. It also helps the wearer deal with nerves and bad skin conditions.

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June 26, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge of Bloodstone

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 2:32 pm
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Gemstone Knowledge of Bloodstone

Bloodstone Jewellery

Bloodstone Jewellery

Family: Bloodstone belongs to the Chalcedony family of gemstones

Country Location: Bloodstone can be found in diverse locations including Australia, Brazil, China and Wyoming (USA). The main source of Bloodstone is found in India and the Kathiawar Peninsula.

Rock Type: Bloodstone can be found in silica rich deposits.

Hardness: Bloodstone’s hardness measures at 7, making it durable to wear during the day.

Popular Cuts: Bloodstone can be found using the Cameo cut, which was very popular during the Roman times as it made the perfect background for raised reliefs.  It is also found using the cabochon cut which highlights its special colour, spots and veins.

Colour: Bloodstone has a unique colour design.  Its background is a combination of dark-greens which has deep red, brown and multi-coloured spots falling upon it.   It is the iron minerals (which also make bright red Jasper) that cause these coloured spots.  The red spots are thought to look like drops of blood, hence the name Bloodstone.

Lustre: Bloodstone lustre is Vitreous

History: Bloodstone has a long, intriguing history.  Roman soldiers used to be given a Cameo of Bloodstone if they had won a battle.  In the middle ages, the drops of red were considered to be the blood of Christ; so many religious people wore Bloodstone.

Folklore: Bloodstone folklore beliefs have varied throughout time.  During Ancient times, Bloodstone was used to heal haemorrhages, stomach pains and bladder infections. It was also considered very magical.  In the middle Ages, Bloodstone was believed to purify organs and blood circulation, hence why it was carried by soldiers.  In the 19th century, Bloodstone was considered the stone for gamblers as it was said to bring luck, strength of mind and success.

Birthstone: Bloodstone is the alternative birthstone of February

June 22, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge of Bixbite (Red Beryl)

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 3:02 pm
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Gemstone Knowledge of Bixbite (Red Beryl)

Bixbite (Red Beryl) Gemstone

Bixbite (Red Beryl) Gemstone

Family: Bold Bixbite belongs to the Quartz family of gemstones

Country Location: Bixbite has a very restricted amount of sources.  The two locations known are the Wah Wah Mountains (Utah, USA) and Mexico.

Rock Type: Bixbite can be found in pegmatites (a coarse grained igneous rock), metamorphic rock and silica rich volcanic rocks.  To crystallize, Bixbite needs low pressure and high temperature conditions, often found in the gas phase along fractures and cavities.  Bixbite is often found where Topaz, Spessartite and other Quartz have formed.

Hardness: Bixbite’s hardness measures at 7.5 making it resilient when mined for jewellery use.

Popular Cuts: Bixbite can only be found using the Brilliant Cut which accentuates its birefringence (double refraction), rich colour and fire.

Colour: Bixbite is most commonly found in a rich, clear red hue with blue tinges. This rich red colour is created by the elements of manganese and caesium, whereas the blue tones can be attributed to titanium elements.

Lustre: Bixbite’s lustre is Vitreous.

History: Bixbite, also known as Red Beryl, is named after Maynard Bixby, a well known mineral collector.  Because Bixbite is considered very rare and expensive, those stones faceted for jewellery use are no larger than 3 carats.

Folklore: Bixbite has a fanciful folklore around it.  Many believe that it increases physical energy, creativity and awareness.  It also promotes harmony in relationships.  Some believe Bixbite helps those to deal with anxiety and depression.  Physically, Bixbite helps quell digestive disorders and strengthen the heart and lungs.

Birthstone: Bixbite is an alternative birthstone of April.

June 17, 2009

Gemstone Jewellery of Baryte

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 4:02 pm
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Gemstone Jewellery of Baryte

Gemstone Baryte

Gemstone Baryte

Family: Blazing Baryte belongs to its own family of gemstones

Country Location: Baryte can be found in a multitude of locations. These include Sweden (Karlsborg, Uppland, Dansland and Varmland regions), Finland (Sodakyla region), Italy (Bologna), Romania, Germany and even in England (Cumbria, Cornwall and Derbyshire)

Rock Type: Baryte can be found as bladed white masses; in clusters with its crystals growing adjacent to each other; tabular crystals or replacement deposits in sedimentary rocks (formed beneath the earth’s surface). It can also be found in limestone deposited by hot springs

Hardness: Baryte’s hardness measures at 3- 3.5, making it a fairly soft gemstone; best used in pieces worn infrequently

Popular Cuts: Baryte can be mostly found using the Step cut, which helps maximize protection against damage; the Mixed cut to display the gemstones brilliance and warm glowing hues and the Polished cut to show the structure of Baryte crystals in concentric bands.  Baryte’s perfect cleavage means it is only faceted for collectors and not specific jewellery pieces

Colour: Baryte’s brilliant colour ranges from colourless, white, yellowish-brown (most common), grey and blue.  In daylight, a yellowish-brown tinge is more apparent.  In UV light, shades of orange or pink are more apparent.  Baryte has the optical property of birefringence, meaning it splits light rays in two (also known as double refraction)

Lustre: Baryte’s lustre is Vitreous to Pearly

History: Baryte adopts an interesting history.  Its name is taken from the Greek word “bapos”, meaning heavy.  This is because being a non-metallic mineral; it has a specific gravity of 4.45.   Baryte can also be referred to as “Bologna stone” as specimens were found in the 17th century, by Vincenzo Cascariolo, an Italian alchemist.  In 1959, the spelling of Baryte was changed to the more Americanized spelling “Barite”, although, in 1978, this was reversed

Folklore: Baryte has a fantastic folklore surrounding it.  Firstly, it is believed to improve decisiveness, writing mannerisms and muscles.  Secondly, it is believed to promote clearer insight, increased patience and the natural flow of energy

Special Care: Baryte is slightly soluble in water and very soluble in salt and acid solutions; therefore to clean, only use a soft cloth

Extra Info: Baryte has the physical properties which enable it to be used in the manufacture of paper and paints

June 11, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge of Andalusite

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 3:00 pm
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Gemstone Knowledge of Andalusite

Andalusite Gemstone

Andalusite Gemstone

Family: Amazing Andalusite belongs to the Quartz family of gemstones

Country Location: Andalusite can be found in mines located in Andalusia, Spain (where the stone is named after), Brazil and the USA

Rock Type: Andalusite can be found in metamorphic rocks, formed in low pressure, but high temperature conditions. The unique combination of kyanite and sillimanite often decipher Andalusite gems

Hardness: Andalusite’s hardness measures at 7.5 making it as durable as Aquamarine.  You can wear Andalusite day or night

Popular Cuts: Andalusite is mostly found using the Oval, Marquise or Emerald cut.  These types of cut allow the gem to display one colour in the centre, surrounded by a darker colour at each end.  If the cutter wants a mosaic-like colour, they will choose to use a Princess or round Brilliant cut to blend the colours

Lustre: Andalusite’s lustre is Vitreous (glass like appearance)

History: Andalusite is considered to be a more recent gemstone.  Despite it being discovered in 1789, it had not been considered as a gem for jewellery use until the end of the 20th century

Folklore: Andalusite is believed to lower fever, rheumatism, arthritis, and gout and balance immune systems It also helps the wearer during trauma

Extra Info: There has been a unique version of Andalusite discovered called Chiastolite.  This stone contains black clay like material

June 10, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge – Amber

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 2:49 pm

Amber

Amber Pendants

Amber Pendants

Family: Astonishing Amber belongs to the Organics family of gemstones

Country Location: Amber can be found along the coasts of Eastern Europe (mainly Poland, Romania and Russia), Mexico, Canada, USA and even along the southern coasts of England

Rock Type: Amber can be found in deposits along shorelines.  It is thought that it took millions of years for Amber to form, as in essence, it is the preserved resin of prehistoric trees that have captured different species.  These species can sometime be seen, making each piece unique

Hardness: Amber’s hardness measures at 2.5 making it a perfect evening piece

Popular Cuts- Amber is mostly found using the Bead cut to highlights its warm glow, cloudy and transparent areas; the Cameo cut in brooches and the Polished Cut to accentuate its unique inclusions

Colour: Amber’s alluring colour ranges from golden yellow, golden orange, green, red, violet and black

Lustre: Amber’s lustre is resinous

History: In ancient cultures, Amber was considered as a commodity to purchase land, animals and slaves worldwide, as it was found on beaches when waves threw them out during storms

Folklore: Amber has an interesting folklore history.  It was believed to protect, attract happiness and luck, guarantee success when hunting or fishing and prevent evil from coming near

Birthstone- Amber is the alternative birthstone for November

Special Care: Amber is considered to be very delicate, so ensure that your Amber jewellery is placed in its own section in your jewellery box, to prevent it being scratched.  To clean Amber, use lukewarm water on a soft cloth or cotton bud.  To maintain Amber’s polish, clean as above, dry carefully, rub olive oil over it very lightly and remove excess oil by rubbing it with a soft cloth

June 4, 2009

Gemstone Knowledge of Agate

Filed under: Gemstone Knowledge — pangsheng @ 3:22 pm
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Gemstone -Agate

Family: Agate belongs to the Chalcedony family of gemstones

Country location: Agate is a gem that can be found mostly in Germany (the Idar-Oberstien region), Uruguay and Brazil. Smaller deposits can be found in India, China and the USA

Rock Type: Agate can be found in nodular masses which occur in fossilized wood or from volcanic lava.  This location is unique to Agate and Amber

Hardness:  Agate’s harness measures at 7- making it a sturdy and decorative gem

Popular cuts: Agate is mostly found using the Cabochon cut for rings, the Cameo cut for brooches and the Polished Cut for accentuating the distinctive angular, wavy or concentric banding

Colour: Agate’s stunning selection of colours includes Teal, Aqua, Pearlescent White, Grey, Black, Brown and Orange

Lustre: Agate’s lustre is vitreous (glass like appearance)

History: Agate has a fascinating history.  It was used by the Babylonians to make weapons to protect their property It was also used to determine royal blood in the Byzantine Empire.  The most popular and well known carver of Agate is the Idar Oberstein region in Germany, who specializes in Agate bowls

Folklore: Agate has a fabulous folklore history.  The Persians believe Agate divert storms Hindu’s believe Agate is key in enabling children to balance, walk and overcome fears.  Modernists believe Agate promotes pleasant dreams, mellow constitution and agreements as well as preventing insomnia and conflict

Birthstone: Agate is the alternative birthstone of May

Special Care: Agates should be kept out of sunlight to prevent colour fade.  Agate should be cleaned using soapy water and a soft cloth

Extra Info: The vivid varieties of Agate include Blue Lace Agate, Crazy Lace Agate and Rainbow Agate

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